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Be glad in the Lord and rejoice! Psalm 32:11



Friday, October 12, 2012

Spotlight on Bourbon Street Books - a great new book imprint!


HarperCollins Publishers has announced the launch of a their new imprint, BOURBON STREET BOOKS, a new line of paperback mystery novels.





HarperCollins has a long and successful history of publishing in the mystery genre. Although Edgar Allen Poe had published mystery short stories in the 1840s, the first detective novel, Wilkie Collins’ The Moonstone, was published by Harper and Row in 1868 and introduced the genre in that form. And, since 2010, HarperCollins has been the global publisher of the Agatha Christie estate.

BOURBON STREET BOOKS will publish all types of mysteries and will feature paperback originals, reprints, backlist titles, and reissued classics.

BBS is bringing back into print the charming and lively Dorothy L. Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey with Harriet Vane series for the launch on October 16th, including Strong Poison, Have His Carcase, Busman’s Honeymoon, and Gaudy Night




The classic mystery that first featured Harriet Vane, companion sleuth to the dashing, perennially popular private investigator Lord Peter Wimsey, from the writer widely considered the greatest mystery novelist of the Golden Age—Dorothy L. Sayers.

Mystery novelist Harriet Vane knew all about poisons, and when her fiance  died in the manner prescribed in one of her books, a jury of her peers had a hangman's noose in mind. But Lord Peter Wimsey was determined to prove her innocent—as determined as he was to make her his wife.




Mystery novelist Harriet Vane, recovering from an unhappy love affair and its most unpleasant aftermath, seeks solace on a barren beach deserted but for one notable exception: the body of a bearded young man with his throat cut. From the moment she photographs the corpse, which soon disappears with the tide, she is puzzled by a mystery that might easily have been a suicide, a murder, or a political plot. With the appearance of her dear friend Lord Peter Wimsey, however, Harriet finds yet another reason to pursue the mystery, as only the two of them can pursue it.





When Harriet Vane attends her Oxford reunion, known as the Gaudy, the prim academic setting is haunted by a rash of bizarre pranks: scrawled obscenities, burnt effigies, and poison-pen letters, including one that says, "Ask your boyfriend with the title if he likes arsenic in his soup." Some of the notes threaten murder; all are perfectly ghastly; yet in spite of their scurrilous nature, all are perfectly worded. And Harriet finds herself ensnared in a nightmare of romance and terror, with only the tiniest shreds of clues to challenge her powers of detection, and those of her paramour, Lord Peter Wimsey.




Murder is hardly the best way for Lord Peter and his bride, the famous mystery writer Harriet Vane, to start their honeymoon. It all begins when the former owner of their newly acquired estate is found quite nastily dead in the cellar. All too quickly, what Lord Peter had hoped would be a very private and romantic stay in the country has turned into a most baffling case, with a misspelled "notise" to the milkman at its center and a dead man who's been discovered in a most intriguing condition: with not a spot of blood on his smashed skull and not a penny less than six hundred pounds in his pocket.
 


 
 
I received review copies of these books from the publisher for my consideration. I was not compensated for my opinion.

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